Stories featured in Quartz Logo

“You cannot feed your family with the production of your fields alone,” said Roberto Cortez Viliegas, a 64-year old campesino from Totontepec in Oaxaca. He said that climate change is creating unusually long periods of drought in the rainy season. Source: Teake Zuidema

Drought Is Crippling Small Farmers in Mexico (PHOTOS)

Campesinos grow rare varieties of maize whose genes may hold the key to more sustainable farming. If they go out of business, we’re in trouble. Talk with farmers in Mexico and they will tell you they’re already feeling the brunt of climate change. Persistent heat and meager rainfall are drying out the land, posing a significant challengeREAD MORE


Farming with Artificial Intelligence

Farming with Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Our Food Supply

The next great agricultural revolution may soon be here. Wine growers have a neat, if unusual, trick for making more flavorful wine — don’t water the vines. Let the vines go dry right before harvest, and they will yield smaller grapes with more skin and less juice. Smaller grapes produce wine with a deeper color and more complexREAD MORE


Students Climate Change Nexus Media News

This Year, Graduating Seniors Will School the Country on Climate Change

In June of 1968, Dartmouth valedictorian James Newton devoted his commencement speech to the foremost issue of his time: the Vietnam war. Calling the conflict a “vast international atrocity,” Newton urged his fellow classmates to resist the war and avoid the draft, earning “energetic booing and walk-outs by parents” and criticism from the follow-up speaker, asREAD MORE


racism climate change denial

The Long Fight Against Racism Shows How to Deal with Climate Denial

Early 20th-century black historian Carter G. Woodson once wrote that schools were places where African-Americans “must be convinced of their inferiority.” He saw that the tools of oppression wielded by white Americans were not limited to billy clubs and poll taxes, but included books, lectures and tests on U.S. history, which left black students with aREAD MORE


a0b36-1ckjnhym8lzn5jgrfcddg-a

Oceans Are Losing a Football Field of Seagrass Every Half-Hour

And with it, a vital tool for cleaning up heat-trapping carbon pollution Source: Pixabay Seagrasses are flowering marine plants that live in shallow coastal waters almost everywhere in the world. The more than 70 species of seagrass provide an important habitat for thousands of ocean animals, from tiny invertebrates, crabs and turtles to large fish andREAD MORE


Source: Pexels

The Year That Climate Change Became a Kitchen-Table Issue

It feels like a standard-issue attack ad—menacing voiceover, pulsing underscore, rust-tinted photos that signal dirt, grime, corruption. The narrator warns of a politician surrounded by “shady characters,” who is profiting off a dubious family business while running a campaign “flooded with dirty coal money.” Here’s the twist. The politician isn’t Donald Trump, and the ad wasn’tREAD MORE


1c021-1eqvqtklme0ca9ge5mz9lka

Will Climate Change Make the Next World Cup Too Hot to Handle?

Qatar is hosting the first winter edition of the World Cup in 2022. Doha, Qatar. Source: Pixabay After four weeks of fanfare, the 2018 World Cup has come to a close. France’s victory in Sunday’s final marked the end of a summer filled with thrilling victories, surprise defeats, national pride (and disappointment), penalty kick-induced panic and many otherREAD MORE


1d2f8-1n3dm5k90cbfamlsfctrujw

Uncovering the Mental Health Crisis of Climate Change

How to move people from apathy to action Source: Pexels The young man believed he only had five years to live. “Not because he was sick,” said Kate Schapira, “not because anything was wrong with him, but because he believed that life on Earth would be impossible for humans.” The sign on Schapira’s booth read: CLIMATE ANXIETYREAD MORE


65a25-158lnuczzq98e6ws1tsh9qw

Climate Change Gets Personal for Shellfish Growers

“We want our grandkids to say that we were part of the solution and not the problem.” Source: PxHere A great wine is the product of many things, from the strain of yeast used in fermentation, to the variety of wood used in the casks, to the soil, climate and topography of the region where theREAD MORE


8bd47-1d65oe-2gyzh1lyud0io6gq

Cities Are Short on Housing. That’s Bad News for the Climate.

A fight in California exposes a rift among city dwellers as to how to provide more affordable housing. San Francisco. Source: Pixabay Over the last decade or so, white-collar workers have flocked to cities, driving up rents and triggering shortages of affordable housing. Now, advocates and policymakers are in a pitched battle over what to do. ThatREAD MORE


d7ea5-1qupd3ttwr8ged5rhadwbbg

Young Americans Want to Save You From Climate Change

“Some people might not believe in climate change, but we’re asking them to believe in us.” The People’s Climate March in Washington, DC on April 29, 2017. Source: Nexus Media It was one of the largest youth-led protests since the Vietnam War, as hundreds of thousands of Americans took to the capital to protest gun violence. But itREAD MORE


20b2a-1wkqvgd8h61gd7ae2_dk-va

Is Partisanship the New Religion?

Political parties appear more important than churches in shaping attitudes about contentious issues like climate change. Source: Pixabay President Trump enjoys a 61 percent approval rating among white evangelical Christians, despite the fact that he does not seem to share many of their core beliefs. He may be willing to appoint pro-life judges, and he’s hawkish onREAD MORE


a6a36-1uhjyz63jxv4qnqnf4xxnpq

Pollution, Race and the Search for Justice (VIDEO)

How communities of color are reclaiming their power A refinery in Louisiana. Source: Jonathan Beilin Without a touch of irony, the EPA celebrated Black History Month by publishing a report that finds black communities face dangerously high levels of pollution. African-Americans are more likely to live near landfills and industrial plants that pollute water and air and erodeREAD MORE


e8f6a-1bghgm_e47xrymgpc8sdy_a

Extreme Temperature Fluctuations Tied to Increase in Heart Attacks

New research finds even more health impacts of climate change. Source: Pexels Temperatures along the East Coast began fluctuating wildly last month, from winter-like cold one day — which is normal for February — to summer-like hot the next day — which is anything but. This is a portentous harbinger of global climate change, and an irksome turn of events, as it forcedREAD MORE


46b92-1cvn68czilkjeu0xegic2hg

Cutting-Edge Design On Display at Super Bowl LII

The Patriots will face the Eagles in a stadium built to endure climate change. The new U.S. Bank Stadium. Source: Nic Lehoux Early one December morning in 2010, the inflatable roof on the Minnesota Vikings’ old stadium in Minneapolis ruptured and collapsed under the weight of 17 inches of wet snow. No one was hurt, but the incidentREAD MORE


0c811-1o-u2yztrrlbdf2dozkbeua

Coal Country Knows Trump Can’t Save It

“No matter how many times you beat and kick that dead horse, it’s not getting up to plow again.” Workers at a mine near Richlands, Virginia, 1974. Source: Jack Corn Since taking office, President Trump has been checking items off of a coal-industry wish list—ditching the Paris Agreement, stripping environmental safeguards, undermining workplace protections for miners. While theREAD MORE


55ffd-19itbmmprgnhvnfm1eg3ysw

Why Are There No Good Movies About Climate Change?

“You have to invent a compelling story. It’s all about story.” A shot from Geostorm. Source: Warner Bros. It’s Oscar season, and Hollywood is abuzz with chatter about the year’s best flicks, which include films about poverty, racism and war. Not mentioned by prognosticators is 2017's one big movie about climate change, Geostorm, a sci-fi thriller so thinREAD MORE


The Cost of Saving the World

The Cost of Saving the World

This week, diplomats are gathered in Bonn, Germany to hammer out the latest details of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. While the minutiae of the negotiations are important, the real action isn’t at the UN. The climate pact is bottom up, which means it’s up to each country to meet the goals set forth in Paris.READ MORE